U.S. Army Signal Corps, Cape Lookout Office Logbooks, ORG.5011

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U.S. Army Signal Corps, Cape Lookout Office Logbooks, ORG.5011

Abstract

The U. S. Army Signal Corps was first established on June 21, 1860 when army doctor Albert James Myer proposed the army use his visual communication system called "wigwag." In addition to visual signaling, the electric telegraph became a signal corps responsibility in 1867. Within twelve years, the Signal Corps had constructed, and was maintaining, some 4,000 miles of telegraph lines along the country's western frontier. Weather forecasting and military communications were among its many responsibilities. The Signal Corps established an office at Cape Lookout around 1876.
This collection contains the Cape Lookout station's logbooks, which features records of incoming and outgoing communications, as well as daily journals.

Descriptive Summary

Title
U.S. Army Signal Corps, Cape Lookout Office Logbooks
Call Number
ORG.5011
Creator
United States. Army. Signal Corps. Cape Lookout Office.
Date
1876-1885
Extent
7.00 items
Language
English
Repository
Outer Banks History Center

Series Quick Links

  1. Collection Contents

Restrictions on Access & Use

Access Restrictions

Available for research.

Use Restrictions

Copyright is retained by the authors of these materials, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law (Title 17 US Code). Individual researchers are responsible for using these materials in conformance with copyright law as well as any donor restrictions accompanying the materials.

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], ORG.5011, U.S. Army Signal Corps, Cape Lookout Office Logbooks, Outer Banks History Center, Manteo, N.C., U.S.A.

Collection Overview

This collection features five logbooks of the incoming and outgoing communications of the U. S. Army Signal Corps office at Cape Lookout. These communications deal with day to day operations, supply requests, expenses, telegraph line conditions and repairs, weather, and semi-annual reports. Specific references are made to nearby places such as Fort Macon, Morehead City, the Cape Lookout Lighthouse, as well as the station at Wilmington. Other major events detailed are the hurricane of September 17, 1876, as well as several shipwrecks, most significantly the wreck of the steamer , with the loss of thirteen lives. In addition to the logbooks are two daily journals. These journals were predominately used to keep track of the weather, but were also used to record when cautionary signals were ordered. They also kept track of the condition of instruments and telegraph line repairs.

Arrangement Note

This collection is divided into three series: letters received, letters sent, and daily journals. In addition, the logbooks and journals are organized chronologically within those series.

Historical Note

The U. S. Army Signal Corps was first established on June 21, 1860 when army doctor Albert James Myer proposed the army use his visual communication system called "wigwag." In addition to visual signaling, the electric telegraph became a signal corps responsibility in 1867. Within twelve years, the Signal Corps had constructed, and was maintaining, some 4,000 miles of telegraph lines along the country's western frontier. Weather forecasting and military communications were among its many responsibilities. The Signal Corps established an office at Cape Lookout around 1876. Life at the Cape Lookout station was extremely isolated, often the staff had little to no human contact.

Contents of the Collection

Collection Contents
Finding Aid
1:1.1
Logbooks - Letters Sent, 1876-1885
8093
Daily Journals, 1876-1880
8097
Logbooks - Letters Received, 1876-1880
8090

Subject Headings

  • United States. Army. Signal Corps--Archives
  • Shipwrecks--North Carolina--Lookout, Cape
  • Weather--North Carolina--Lookout, Cape
  • Fort Macon (N.C.)
  • Lookout, Cape (N.C.)
  • Morehead City (N.C.)
  • Wilmington (N.C.)
  • Acquisitions Information

    Donated by the Museum of the Albemarle

    Processing Information

  • Processed by Sarah Downing, 1997
  • Encoded by Kelly Grimm, August, 2009