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Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Washington Lodge No. 3 (Murfreesboro, Hertford Co.), Anchoree Lodge No. 14, and Tulula Encampment No. 8 (Pasquotank Co.)


The Independent Order of Odd Fellows was established in eighteenth century England as a secret, fraternal society. The American order was founded in 1819 and began to spread to the various states. North Carolina lodges were established in subsequent decades, at least as early as 1842.This collection contains a minute book of the following: Washington Lodge No. 3, Murphreesboro (Hertford County), 1842-1856; and microfilmed minutes of the following: I.O.O.F., Anchoree Lodge No. 14, Pasquotank County, 1854-1895; and I.O.O.F., Tulula Encampment No. 8, Pasquotank County, 1849-1875.

Title

Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Washington Lodge No. 3 (Murfreesboro, Hertford Co.), Anchoree Lodge No. 14, and Tulula Encampment No. 8 (Pasquotank Co.)

Collection Number

Org.65

Date(s)

1842 - 1895

Language

English

Physical Description
Fibredex box
1
Reel microfilm
1
Physical Description
Reels
1.00
Abstract

The Independent Order of Odd Fellows was established in eighteenth century England as a secret, fraternal society. The American order was founded in 1819 and began to spread to the various states. North Carolina lodges were established in subsequent decades, at least as early as 1842.

This collection contains a minute book of the following: Washington Lodge No. 3, Murphreesboro (Hertford County), 1842-1856; and microfilmed minutes of the following: I.O.O.F., Anchoree Lodge No. 14, Pasquotank County, 1854-1895; and I.O.O.F., Tulula Encampment No. 8, Pasquotank County, 1849-1875.

Physical Location

For current information on the location ofthese materials, please consult the Public Services Branch, State Archives of North Carolina.

Creator

Independent Order of Odd Fellows.

Repository

State Archives of North Carolina


This collection is organized into 3 series: I.O.O.F., Washington Lodge No. 3, Murphreesboro (Hertford County), Records, I.O.O.F., Anchoree Lodge No. 14, (Pasquotank County), Records, and I.O.O.F., Tulula Encampment No. 8, Pasquotank County, Records. Arrangement is chronological within the series.


Available for research.


Copyright is retained by the authors of these materials, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law (Title 17 US Code). Individual researchers are responsible for using these materials in conformance with copyright law as well as any donor restrictions accompanying the materials.


Processed by Carolyn G. Hughes, October, 1959

Encoded by Fran Tracy-Walls, December, 2002


The Independent Order of Odd Fellows (I.O.O.F.), a secret fraternal, benefit society, evolved in England during the eighteenth century. By most accounts, the origin of the name  "Odd Fellows" cannot be traced. Thomas Wildey is considered to have been the founder of the society in America, established at Baltimore in 1819. However, other lodges are known to have existed before Wildey came to the United States. Lodges were established in North Carolina at least as early as 1842.

Historically, the individual lodges of I.O.O.F. have served as both social and relief organizations. The primary tenants held by Odd Fellows have been summarized as friendship, love, and truth. The duties expected of Odd Fellows have been to visit the sick, relieve the distressed, bury the dead, and educate the orphan.

Additionally, during the nineteenth century, some lodges provided a forum for justice. Charges of unacceptable and unbecoming conduct brought against a member by the lodge or by an individual were tried by committee. The consequences of sustained charges might mean expulsion and the loss of relief benefits.

Today the I.O.O.F. emphasizes charitable projects, with goals related to its original injunctions, including relief of the distressed. Collectively, the group maintains a chair of eye research in the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. Currently the international headquarters are in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. By the latter part of the twentieth century, the order had a world-wide membership of over one million.


The Independent Order of Odd Fellows (I.O.O.F.), a secret fraternal, benefit society, evolved in England during the eighteenth century. By most accounts, the origin of the name  "Odd Fellows" cannot be traced. Thomas Wildey is considered to have been the founder of the society in America, established at Baltimore in 1819. However, other lodges are known to have existed before Wildey came to the United States. Lodges were established in North Carolina at least as early as 1842.

Historically, the individual lodges of I.O.O.F. have served as both social and relief organizations. The primary tenants held by Odd Fellows have been summarized as friendship, love, and truth. The duties expected of Odd Fellows have been to visit the sick, relieve the distressed, bury the dead, and educate the orphan.

Additionally, during the nineteenth century, some lodges provided a forum for justice. Charges of unacceptable and unbecoming conduct brought against a member by the lodge or by an individual were tried by committee. The consequences of sustained charges might mean expulsion and the loss of relief benefits.

Today the I.O.O.F. emphasizes charitable projects, with goals related to its original injunctions, including relief of the distressed. Collectively, the group maintains a chair of eye research in the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. Currently the international headquarters are in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. By the latter part of the twentieth century, the order had a world-wide membership of over one million.


[Identification of item], Org.65, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Washington Lodge No. 3 (Murfreesboro, Hertford Co.), Anchoree Lodge No. 14, and Tulula Encampment No. 8 (Pasquotank Co.), State Archives of North Carolina, Raleigh, NC, USA.


Portions of collection are a gift.


Additional information on topics found in this collection may be found in the Manuscript and Archives Reference System (MARS)  http://www.ncarchives.dcr.state.nc.us.


Included in the records of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows are minutes from the following North Carolina lodges: Washington Lodge No. 3, Murphreesboro (Hertford County) Lodge, Minute Book, 1842-1856; and microfilmed records of the following: I.O.O.F., Anchoree Lodge No. 14, Pasquotank County, Minutes, 1854-1895; and I.O.O.F., Tulula Encampment No. 8, Pasquotank County, Minutes, 1849-1875.

This collection is organized into 3 series: I.O.O.F., Washington Lodge No. 3, Murphreesboro (Hertford County), Records, I.O.O.F., Anchoree Lodge No. 14, (Pasquotank County), Records, and I.O.O.F., Tulula Encampment No. 8, Pasquotank County, Records. Arrangement is chronological within the series.


Included in the records of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows are minutes from the following North Carolina lodges: Washington Lodge No. 3, Murphreesboro (Hertford County) Lodge, Minute Book, 1842-1856; and microfilmed records of the following: I.O.O.F., Anchoree Lodge No. 14, Pasquotank County, Minutes, 1854-1895; and I.O.O.F., Tulula Encampment No. 8, Pasquotank County, Minutes, 1849-1875.


  • Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Anchoree Lodge No. 14 (Pasquotank County,
  • Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Tulula Encampment No. 8 (Pasquotank Count
  • Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Washington Lodge No. 3 (Murfreesboro, N.C
  • Associations, institutions, etc.--North Carolina--History--19th century.
  • Fraternal organizations
  • Secret societies--History--19th century.
  • Hertford County (N.C.)
  • Pasquotank County (N.C.)

Box: 1  
Minute Book
1842-1856

Box: MF X.12IP  
Minutes
1854-1895

Descriptive Information
Physical Description
microfilm

16059
Minutes
1849-1875