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North Carolina Committee to End the War in Indochina, Raleigh Chapter Records


The North Carolina Committee to End the War in Indochina was a grass roots effort originating in Winston-Salem in February, 1971, following a meeting on the Wake Forest University Campus. The Committee attracted support from all areas of the state, and local chapters were formed in Greensboro and Raleigh. The stated purpose of the organization wasto further a rapid end to all United States military involvement in the Indochina War through complete withdrawal of all U.S. forces by December 31, 1971, by order of the President or by congressional prohibition of the use of funds for the war after that date. It encouraged citizens to write or visit their congressmen, to provide information to int ... (more below)

Title

North Carolina Committee to End the War in Indochina, Raleigh Chapter Records

Collection Number

Org.99

Date(s)

1971 - 1973

Language

English

Physical Description
Folders
8
Abstract

The North Carolina Committee to End the War in Indochina was a grass roots effort originating in Winston-Salem in February, 1971, following a meeting on the Wake Forest University Campus. The Committee attracted support from all areas of the state, and local chapters were formed in Greensboro and Raleigh. The stated purpose of the organization was  "to further a rapid end to all United States military involvement in the Indochina War" through complete withdrawal of all U.S. forces by December 31, 1971, by order of the President or by congressional prohibition of the use of funds for the war after that date. It encouraged citizens to write or visit their congressmen, to provide information to interested persons by mailing material on pending legislation, and to invite speakers to discuss the situation in Indochina. The Raleigh Chapter held its first meeting March 7, 1971, at the West Raleigh Presbyterian Church.

The bulk of the material of the North Carolina Committee to End the War in Indochina, Raleigh Chapter, is made up of letters; policy statements and papers (document genres); speech transcripts, clippings, etc., dated 1971-1973, that reflect the positions of various public officials and prospective candidates concerning the situation in Southeast Asia, specifically the war in Vietnam; and some material relating to prisoners of war.

Physical Location

For current information on the location ofthese materials, please consult the Public Services Branch, State Archives of North Carolina.

Creator

North Carolina Committee to End the War in Indochina. Raleigh Chapter.

Repository

State Archives of North Carolina


This collection is arranged by chronology and by topic.


Available for research.


Copyright is retained by the authors of these materials, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law (Title 17 US Code). Individual researchers are responsible for using these materials in conformance with copyright law as well as any donor restrictions accompanying the materials.


Processed by Ellen Z. McGrew, January, 1977

Encoded by Fran Tracy-Walls, September, 2002


The North Carolina Committee to End the War in Indochina was a grass roots effort originating in Winston-Salem in February, 1971, following a meeting on the Wake Forest University Campus. At that event, David Schoenbrun, foreign correspondent and author of  Vietnam; How We Got In, How to Get Out, 1968, addressed a crowd of 2,000 persons drawn from all walks of life. The Committee attracted support from all areas of the state, and local chapters were formed in Greensboro and Raleigh. Among the sponsors were Terry Sanford, president of Duke University; James Scales, president of Wake Forest University; and Charles Wade, Jr., of the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company.

The stated purpose of the organization was  "to further a rapid end to all United States military involvement in the Indochina War" through complete withdrawal of all U.S. forces by December 31, 1971, by order of the President or by congressional prohibition of the use of funds for the war after that date. The Committee was dedicated  "to the use of peaceful and legal means traditional to our democratic way of life". It encouraged citizens to write or visit their congressmen, to provide information to interested persons by mailing material on pending legislation, and to invite speakers to discuss the situation in Indochina.

The Raleigh Chapter held its first meeting March 7, 1971, at the West Raleigh Presbyterian Church. In addition to activities cited above, the chapter sponsored an address by Senator Vance Hartke at Meredith College in June, 1971.


The North Carolina Committee to End the War in Indochina was a grass roots effort originating in Winston-Salem in February, 1971, following a meeting on the Wake Forest University Campus. At that event, David Schoenbrun, foreign correspondent and author of  Vietnam; How We Got In, How to Get Out, 1968, addressed a crowd of 2,000 persons drawn from all walks of life. The Committee attracted support from all areas of the state, and local chapters were formed in Greensboro and Raleigh. Among the sponsors were Terry Sanford, president of Duke University; James Scales, president of Wake Forest University; and Charles Wade, Jr., of the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company.

The stated purpose of the organization was  "to further a rapid end to all United States military involvement in the Indochina War" through complete withdrawal of all U.S. forces by December 31, 1971, by order of the President or by congressional prohibition of the use of funds for the war after that date. The Committee was dedicated  "to the use of peaceful and legal means traditional to our democratic way of life". It encouraged citizens to write or visit their congressmen, to provide information to interested persons by mailing material on pending legislation, and to invite speakers to discuss the situation in Indochina.

The Raleigh Chapter held its first meeting March 7, 1971, at the West Raleigh Presbyterian Church. In addition to activities cited above, the chapter sponsored an address by Senator Vance Hartke at Meredith College in June, 1971.


[Identification of item], Org.99, North Carolina Committee to End the War in Indochina, Raleigh Chapter Records, State Archives of North Carolina, Raleigh, NC, USA.


Donated by Elizabeth (Mrs. Richard) Axtell, Raleigh (for the Steering Committee) via Mary K. (Mrs. Ernest) Hodgson, Raleigh, January 3, 1977.


Additional information on topics found in this collection may be found in the Manuscript and Archives Reference System (MARS)  http://www.ncarchives.dcr.state.nc.us.


A significant portion of the papers of the North Carolina Committee to End the War in Indochina, Raleigh Chapter, contains information that reflects differing positions taken by various public officials and political candidates on the United States' involvement in Indochina, particularly Vietnam. The material shows the Committee's efforts to encourage citizens to write or visit their congressmen, to provide information to interested persons by mailing material on pending legislation, and to invite speakers to discuss the situation in Indochina. As part of its activities, the chapter sponsored an address by Senator Vance Hartke at Meredith College in June, 1971. In response to the letter writing campaign, the committee received an especially interesting letter from Congressman L. H. Fountain (D-N.C.), November 22, 1971. The letter enclosed photocopies of letters from President Richard Nixon and F. Edward Herbert, chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, concerning the defeat of the Nedzi-Whalen amendment which would have cut off funds for the war after December 31, 1971. There is also some material relating to prisoners of war.

This collection is arranged by chronology and by topic.


A significant portion of the papers of the North Carolina Committee to End the War in Indochina, Raleigh Chapter, contains information that reflects differing positions taken by various public officials and political candidates on the United States' involvement in Indochina, particularly Vietnam. The material shows the Committee's efforts to encourage citizens to write or visit their congressmen, to provide information to interested persons by mailing material on pending legislation, and to invite speakers to discuss the situation in Indochina. As part of its activities, the chapter sponsored an address by Senator Vance Hartke at Meredith College in June, 1971. In response to the letter writing campaign, the committee received an especially interesting letter from Congressman L. H. Fountain (D-N.C.), November 22, 1971. The letter enclosed photocopies of letters from President Richard Nixon and F. Edward Herbert, chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, concerning the defeat of the Nedzi-Whalen amendment which would have cut off funds for the war after December 31, 1971. There is also some material relating to prisoners of war.


  • Nixon, Richard M. (Richard Milhous), 1913-1994.
  • North Carolina Committee to End the War in Indochina.
  • Legislators--United States.
  • Peace movements--North Carolina--History--20th century.
  • Political candidates--United States.
  • Presidents--United States--Addresses, essays, lectures.
  • Prisoners of war--United States.
  • Prisoners of war--Vietnam.
  • Vietnam War, 1961-1975--Protest movements
  • Vietnam War, 1961-1975--Prisoners and prisons, North Vietnamese.
  • Raleigh (N.C.)
  • Winston-Salem (N.C.)
  • Letters (correspondence)
  • Fountain, L. H. (Lawrence H.), 1913-2002.

Folder: 1  
Correspondence, programs, policy statements, etc.
April-August, 1971

Letters from senators and congressmen: Nick Galifinakis, Sam Ervin, B. Everett Jordan, L. H. Fountain, Vance Hartke.
Acknowledgements of invitations to speak in Raleigh from Senators Mark Hatfield, Stuart Symington, Harold E. Hughes.
Program, itinerary, and excerpt from speech of Senator Vance Hartke, Meredith College Auditorium, .
June 1, 1971
Statement by Senator B. Everett Jordan on the situation in Southeast Asia
May 25, 1971

Folder: 2  
Correspondence, programs, policy statements, etc.
September-December, 1971

Letters from senators/congressmen: Roy A. Taylor, Alton Lennon, Hugh Scott, B. Everett Jordan, Nick Galifinakis, Wilmer Mizell, Robert Dole, Birch Bayh, Edmund Muskie, L. H. Fountain (with enclosures to and from President Nixon and from Edward Hebert) - Acknowledgements for speaking invitations from Charles Goodell, Clark Clifford, Adlai Stevenson III, Clifton Daniel, and Robert F. Drinan.
Advertisement: John Kerry, leader of the Vietnam Veterans for Peace, speaker at UNC-Greensboro, sponsored by Greensboro Chapter, .
October 11, 1971
Statements by Edmund Muskie re Hatfield-McGovern Amendment, Mansfield Amendment, prisoners of war, South Vietnamese election, residual force, and draft; .
October, 1971
Advertisement: Raleigh Chapter, sponsoring filmWinter Soldier - NCSU Veterans for Peace, YMCA, .
December 9, 1971
Excerpts from Secretary of Defense Melvin Laird's news conference, on the bombing of North Vietnam and Defense Department activities in 1971,New York Times
December 27, 1971

Folder: 3  
Correspondence, programs, policy statements, etc.
January-March, 1972

Letters from deputy assistant Secretary of Defense and acting assistant secretary for public affairs, Department of State.
Statements from candidates for U.S. Senate: William H. Booe of Charlotte, James C. Johnson, Jr. of Concord, Charles S. Bullock of Knightdale
Transcript of President Nixon's address to the nation on U.S. policy in Vietnam, January 25, 1972 [New York Times,]
January 26, 1972
Partial text of President Nixon's comments on prisoners of war and Vietnam, from an hour-long interview with CBS White House correspondent Dan Rather
January 2, 1972
News briefing by Secretary of Defense Melvin R. Laird at White House
January 13, 1972
Interview of Secretary of Defense Laird by Elizabeth Drew, WETZ-TV
January 13, 1972
Department of State Publication No. 8589, East Asian and Pacific Series, [enclosed in 1972 correspondence],Viet-Nam: Ending U. S. Involvement in the War, Released
June, 1971
Department of State Publication No. 8603,A Program for Peace in Viet-Nam, released etc.
October, 1971,

Folder: 4  
Correspondence, etc.
April-May, 1972

Statements from candidates for U. S. Senate: B. Everett Jordan, Joe Brown,The Working Man's Candidate)of Greensboro; Gene Grace of Durham.
Statements from candidates for House of Representatives: Nick Galifianakis, Ike Andrews, William Creech, Wense Grabarek, Jyles Coggins, Archie McMillan. Also statements from Janes T. Broyhill and Richardson Preyer, congressmen.
News release, Bureau of Public Affairs, Department of State, May 10, 1972, including texts of President Nixon's May 8 address to the nation; U. S. Ambassador to the U. N. (George Bush) letter of May 8 to president of U. N. Security Council; and White House press conference of May 9 of Henry A. Kissinger, ass't to the President for National Security Affairs
May, 1972
Correspondence and literature of Peace Alert USA, Washington, D.C. (national co-chairmen: Senators Harold Hughes and Alan Cranston with Congressmen Paul McCloskey and Donald Reigle). Notice of national peace poll to begin May 28 with balloting through newspapers--a bi-partisan effort to answer the question,Should Congress bring the war to an end by cutting off the funds?
Scope and Content

[Note: Raleigh Chapter was unable to finance newspaper advertisement so it multilithed 2,000 copies of the ballot and distributed at Democratic State Convention.]

Folder: 5  
Letters
1973

Scope and Content

Raleigh Chapter, January 1973: lists members of congress; April 7, 1973; chapter inactivated March 31. The latter letter noted that military involvement had not ended and peace was yet to be achieved, but that chapter  "has done as much as it was possible for it to do."

Folder: 6  
Newspaper Clippings
1971-1973

Folder: 7  
Publications, , n.d.
1971

Winston-Salem Chapter:Vietnam Chronology, A History of Struggle, by Dr. Errol Clauss.The North Carolina Committee to End the War in Indochina. Goal--complete withdrawal by the end of this year [1971]
Raleigh Chapter:Candidates' Views on the Vietnam War

Folder: 8  
Miscellaneous, no date

Scope and Content

Statistics compiled by Raleigh, Winston-Salem, and Greensboro chapters, including figures of those killed and wounded each year, 1961-1971. News release from Greensboro Chapter re talk by wife of a prisoner of war at home of president of Guilford College.