Finding Aid of the Joseph John Jackson Papers, 1836 - 1930, PC.1147

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Finding Aid of the Joseph John Jackson Papers, 1836 - 1930, PC.1147

Abstract

Joseph John Jackson, son of Samuel S. and Elizabeth Jackson, was educated at the University of North Carolina (B.A.,1838, M.A., 1843), and later served as trustee of the university (1858-1868). As an attorney practicing in Pittsboro, Jackson was active in Chatham County and state politics. The papers in this collection date from 1836 to 1930, with a majority created during the course of Jackson's professional life, or arising as evidences relating to real property in which he had an interest or was an owner.

Descriptive Summary

Title
Joseph John Jackson Papers
Call Number
PC.1147
Creator
Jackson, Joseph John, 1817-1902.
Date
1836 - 1930
Extent
960.00 items
Language
English
Repository
State Archives of North Carolina

Restrictions on Access & Use

Access Restrictions

Available for research.

Use Restrictions

Copyright is retained by the authors of these materials, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law (Title 17 US Code). Individual researchers are responsible for using these materials in conformance with copyright law as well as any donor restrictions accompanying the materials.

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], PC.1147, Joseph John Jackson Papers, State Archives of North Carolina, Raleigh, NC, USA.

Collection Overview

The papers in this collection were created during the course of Jackson's professional life, or otherwise served as evidences relating to real property in which Jackson had an interest or was an owner.

The Cotton Claim Papers series begins with Jackson's efforts, as appointed agent, to demand, collect, and receive for the benefit of the state all cotton and other property belonging to the state in various counties. When United States Treasury agents seized 74 bales of the cotton belonging to the state and refused to allow Jackson to take possession of it, he entered into a contract with Gov. Tod Caldwell to attempt recovery of the value of the cotton from the U.S. government. Jackson later conveyed his legal interest under the state contract to his son, Samuel Spencer Jackson, who continued to press the claim until a successful conclusion was reached in 1928. The Horneville Property Papers series concerns tracts of land purchased by J.J. Jackson, among others, on Deep River in the coal region of Chatham County. In 1851, these tracts were incorporated as the Chatham Mining and Manufacturing Company (commonly called the Horneville Coal Company). The Pittsboro Property Deeds include muniments of title to Joseph John Jackson's town property in Pittsboro, N.C. There is also a Miscellaneous Papers series.

Arrangement Note

The papers fall into four categories: Cotton Claim Papers, 1863-1928; Horneville Property Papers, 1850-1903; Pittsboro Property Papers, 1836-1871; and, Miscellaneous Papers, 1866-1930.

Biographical Note

Joseph John Jackson (1817-1902), Pittsboro attorney-at-law, was the son of Samuel S. and Elizabeth Jackson. Educated at the University of North Carolina, Jackson was awarded the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1838, and Master of Arts in 1843, having, in the interim, represented Chatham County in the House of Commons during the 1842-1843 session of the General Assembly. He subsequently served as county attorney for Chatham County for 18 years, and was a trustee of the University of North Carolina from 1858 to 1868. Jackson married one of the daughters of Gov. Jonathan Worth, Lucy Jane Worth, in 1849. (His brother, Samuel Spencer Jackson, Jr., married another Worth daughter, Elvira.) J. J. Jackson was survived by five children: J. W. and S. S. Jackson of Chicago, Mrs. Henry Armand London and Miss Carrie Jackson of Pittsboro, and Mrs. J. H. Currie of Cumberland.

Contents of the Collection

1. Cotton Claim Papers,1863 - 1928

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During the Civil War, Governor Vance had purchased cotton in various counties to be sold on the state's account. In the summer and autumn of 1865 and again in 1866 Joseph John Jackson was appointed agent to demand, collect, and receive for the benefit of the state all cotton and other property belonging to the state in various counties. United States Treasury agents, supported by the United States Army then occupying North Carolina, seized 74 bales of the cotton belonging to the state and refused to allow Jackson to take possession of it. After the cotton had been sold for the benefit of the U.S. Treasury, Jackson in 1874 entered into a contract with Gov. Tod Caldwell to attempt recovery of the value of the cotton from the U.S. government, and to take as his fee a proportionate share of what he might be able to recover.

Before his death, Jackson conveyed to his son, Samuel Spencer Jackson, his legal interest under the state contract. His son continued to press the claim through the first quarter of the twentieth century. It took 54 years for Jackson and his son to prosecute the claim to a successful conclusion, but finally, in 1928, Congress settled the claims of several states, including $96,835 for North Carolina's cotton seized in 1865. Correspondents of the two Jacksons include Governors W.W. Holden, Jonathan Worth, Tod R. Caldwell, Charles B. Aycock and Angus W. McLean; U.S. Senators John Pool, Augustus S. Merrimon, Matt W. Ransom, Zebulon B. Vance and Lee S. Overman; U.S. Representatives James M. Leach, Joseph J. Davis, Alfred Moore Waddell, and Furnifold M. Simmons.

2. Horneville Property Papers,1850 - 1903

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In 1848 or 1849 J. J. Jackson, William Beverhout Thompson, William T. Home, Thomas Hill, and Nathan A. Stedman purchased tracts of land on Deep River in the coal region of Chatham County, and in 1851 were incorporated as the Chatham Mining and Manufacturing Company (commonly called the Horneville Coal Company). Each man then transferred his share of the land to the corporation, becoming in exchange, holder of an equal fifth share in the capital stock of the company. In 1860 Jackson purchased Hill's share, and in 1869 began to look out for the interests of Mrs. W. B. Thompson (her husband having returned to Georgetown, D.C., before the Civil War and since died).

In 1881 John W. Scott of Sanford, N.C., secured control of 8/15 interest in the property and took over its management from Jackson whose financial situation began a decline after the panic of 1873. Eventually Jackson was obliged to take advantage of the Homestead Exemption Act in order to protect a modicum of his property from his creditors. Among the property he listed as part of his homestead was his fifth interest in the Horneville property (mortgaged by him to his sister-in-law, Elvira Worth Moffitt in 1887). This file of papers appears to have been preserved as evidentiary matter reflecting his title to a fifth-share of the Horneville property and establishing his claim against the heirs of William Beverhout Thompson for recovery of his expenses in looking out for Mrs. Thompson's interest in the property.

3. Pittsboro Property Deeds,1836 - 1871

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These warranty, sheriff, quitclaim and mortgage deeds are the muniments of title to Joseph John Jackson's town property in Pittsboro, N.C. (Lots 76, 77, 78, 79, 81, 82, and 83).

4. Miscellaneous Papers,1866 - 1930

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These twelve documents include an 1866 note from Jackson to Governor Worth asking him to forward as soon as possible to "Brother Jack" a box of scuppernong grape cuttings; an 1870 holograph will written by Jackson on the eve of a trip; advice written to his wife in 1875 on how to deal with such realty as remained after his financial failure; an undated manuscript drawing and description of an improved piece of equipment for cotton growing (a cotton blocker); part of a 1930 newspaper obituary of Jackson's daughter, Bettie Louise (Mrs. Henry Armand London); and a negative photostat of J. J. Jackson's certificate of membership in good standing in the Dialectic Society at the University of North Carolina, 1838.

5. Cotton Claim Papers, 1863-1928

Scope and Content:

This is the first series of the Joseph John Jackson Papers. During the Civil War, Governor Vance had purchased cotton in various counties to be sold on the state's account. In the summer and autumn of 1865 and again in 1866 Joseph John Jackson was appointed agent to demand, collect, and receive for the benefit of the state all cotton and other property belonging to the state in various counties. United States Treasury agents, supported by the United States Army then occupying North Carolina, seized 74 bales of the cotton belonging to the state and refused to allow Jackson to take possession of it. After the cotton had been sold for the benefit of the U.S. Treasury, Jackson in 1874 entered into a contract with Gov. Tod Caldwell to attempt recovery of the value of the cotton from the U.S. government, and to take as his fee a proportionate share of what he might be able to recover.

Before his death, Jackson conveyed to his son, Samuel Spencer Jackson, his legal interest under the state contract. His son continued to press the claim through the first quarter of the twentieth century. It took 54 years for Jackson and his son to prosecute the claim to a successful conclusion, but finally, in 1928, Congress settled the claims of several states, including $96,835 for North Carolina's cotton seized in 1865. Correspondents of the two Jacksons include Governors W.W. Holden, Jonathan Worth, Tod R. Caldwell, Charles B. Aycock and Angus W. McLean; U.S. Senators John Pool, Augustus S. Merrimon, Matt W. Ransom, Zebulon B. Vance and Lee S. Overman; U.S. Representatives James M. Leach, Joseph J. Davis, Alfred Moore Waddell, and Furnifold M. Simmons.

Arrangement:

The Cotton Claim Papers are arranged chronologically no matter what the form of the document, whether letter, receipt, deposition, affidavit, petition, bill, report, or other.

6. Pittsboro Property Deeds, 1836-1871

Scope and Content:

This is the third series of the Joseph John Jackson Papers. These warranty, sheriff, quitclaim and mortgage deeds are the muniments of title to Joseph John Jackson's town property in Pittsboro, N.C. (Lots 76, 77, 78, 79, 81, 82, and 83).

Arrangement:

These materials are arranged chronologically.

7. Horneville Property Papers, 1850-1903

Scope and Content:

This is the second series in the Joseph John Jackson Papers. In 1848 or 1849 J. J. Jackson, William Beverhout Thompson, William T. Home, Thomas Hill, and Nathan A. Stedman purchased tracts of land on Deep River in the coal region of Chatham County, and in 1851 were incorporated as the Chatham Mining and Manufacturing Company (commonly called the Horneville Coal Company). Each man then transferred his share of the land to the corporation, becoming in exchange, holder of an equal fifth share in the capital stock of the company. In 1860 Jackson purchased Hill's share, and in 1869 began to look out for the interests of Mrs. W. B. Thompson (her husband having returned to Georgetown, D.C., before the Civil War and since died).

In 1881 John W. Scott of Sanford, N.C., secured control of 8/15 interest in the property and took over its management from Jackson whose financial situation began a decline after the panic of 1873. Eventually Jackson was obliged to take advantage of the Homestead Exemption Act in order to protect a modicum of his property from his creditors. Among the property he listed as part of his homestead was his fifth interest in the Horneville property (mortgaged by him to his sister-in-law, Elvira Worth Moffitt in 1887). This file of papers appears to have been preserved as evidentiary matter reflecting his title to a fifth-share of the Horneville property and establishing his claim against the heirs of William Beverhout Thompson for recovery of his expenses in looking out for Mrs. Thompson's interest in the property.

Arrangement:

Arrangement of the Horneville Property papers is chronological by category: history, correspondence, deeds; bills and receipts, contracts, powers of attorney, rents, and taxes.

8. Miscellaneous Papers, 1866-1930

Scope and Content:

This is the fourth series of the Joseph John Jackson Papers. These twelve documents include an 1866 note from Jackson to Governor Worth asking him to forward as soon as possible to "Brother Jack" a box of scuppernong grape cuttings; an 1870 holograph will written by Jackson on the eve of a trip; advice written to his wife in 1875 on how to deal with such realty as remained after his financial failure; an undated manuscript drawing and description of an improved piece of equipment for cotton growing (a cotton blocker); part of a 1930 newspaper obituary of Jackson's daughter, Bettie Louise (Mrs. Henry Armand London); and a negative photostat of J. J. Jackson's certificate of membership in good standing in the Dialectic Society at the University of North Carolina, 1838.

Subject Headings

  • Horne, William T.
  • Jackson family.
  • London, Betty Louise Jackson, 1853-1930.
  • Scott, John W.
  • Joseph John Jackson, 1817-1902
  • Betty Louise Jackson London
  • Jackson Family
  • Scott, John W.
  • Chatham Mining and Manufacturing Company.
  • University of North Carolina (1793-1962). Dialectic Society.
  • University of North Carolina (1793-1962)
  • University of North Carolina (1793-1962). Dialectic Society
  • Chatham Mining and Manufacturing Company
  • Cotton growing
  • Merchants--North Carolina--Caswell County
  • Scuppernong--North Carolina--History.
  • Sheriffs--North Carolina--Caswell County
  • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Claims.
  • Universities and colleges
  • College students
  • Literary Societies
  • Membership
  • Cotton industry
  • Merchants
  • Scuppernong
  • Sheriffs
  • Chatham County (N.C.)
  • Pittsboro (N.C.)
  • Chatham County (N.C.)
  • Pittsboro
  • Acquisitions Information

    Gift, Katherine Lee Jerome Conely, Southern Pines, N.C., 2003; photocopy transferred from Miscellaneous Papers in 1961.

    Processing Information

  • Processed by George Stevenson, August, 2003
  • Encoded by Fran Tracy-Walls, October, 2003, and updated July 17, 2019