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Whedbee Freedmen Papers


Files of Judge William Armistead Moore, receiver of so much of the estate of James P. Whedbee of Perquimans County, N.C., as had been bequeathed to his slaves in 1852. Upon suit by Whedbee's heirs at-law in 1866 to prevent distribution of a portion of the estate among Whedbee's former slaves, the Supreme Court of North Carolina ruled there had been no lapse in the terms of the will and that distribution was to be made. Judge Moore, as receiver, searched out the original slaves and their heirs (scattered in New York, Boston, Washington, D.C., Yorktown, Va. and various North Carolina towns) in order to pay them their share of the bequest.Includes correspondence, lists of slaves/freedmen, affid ... (more below)

Title

Whedbee Freedmen Papers

Collection Number

PC.1762

Date(s)

1854 - 1882

Language

English

Physical Description
Items
273
Genre/Physical Characteristic

includes 1 volume with 64 items laid in; petition, correspondence, promissory notes, fees on actions, tax receipts, lists, affidavits, powers of attorney, receipts, deeds, and land records.

Abstract

Files of Judge William Armistead Moore, receiver of so much of the estate of James P. Whedbee of Perquimans County, N.C., as had been bequeathed to his slaves in 1852. Upon suit by Whedbee's heirs at-law in 1866 to prevent distribution of a portion of the estate among Whedbee's former slaves, the Supreme Court of North Carolina ruled there had been no lapse in the terms of the will and that distribution was to be made. Judge Moore, as receiver, searched out the original slaves and their heirs (scattered in New York, Boston, Washington, D.C., Yorktown, Va. and various North Carolina towns) in order to pay them their share of the bequest.

Includes correspondence, lists of slaves/freedmen, affidavits of identity, powers of attorney, receipts from freedmen for distributive shares and so forth.

Physical Location

For current information on the location ofthese materials, please consult the Public Services Branch, State Archives of North Carolina.

Creator

Moore, William Armistead.

Repository

State Archives of North Carolina


Available for research.


Copyright is retained by the authors of these materials, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law (Title 17 US Code). Individual researchers are responsible for using these materials in conformance with copyright law as well as any donor restrictions accompanying the materials.


Processed by George Stevenson, March 26, 1991

Encoded by Fran Tracy-Walls, July 17, 2002


James P. Whedbee of Perquimans County was married to Lavinia Whedbee. Whedbee, whose children had all predeceased him, died at the end of 1852 leaving an estate worth in excess of $200,000. In addition to specific bequests, Whedbee left a class bequest of 2/7ths of his property to his slaves, who were to be manumitted upon Whedbee's wife's death. Whedbee further provided that if his wife remarried she was to take the same share of the property as if he had died intestate. Mrs. Whedbee remarried Abram Riddick. Judge Willima Armistead Moore served as receiver of a portion of the estate. As receiver, Judge Moore employed his sons, Augustus Minton Moore and John A. Moore, to track down the original slaves and their heirs.


James P. Whedbee of Perquimans County was married to Lavinia Whedbee. Whedbee, whose children had all predeceased him, died at the end of 1852 leaving an estate worth in excess of $200,000. In addition to specific bequests, Whedbee left a class bequest of 2/7ths of his property to his slaves, who were to be manumitted upon Whedbee's wife's death. Whedbee further provided that if his wife remarried she was to take the same share of the property as if he had died intestate. Mrs. Whedbee remarried Abram Riddick. Judge Willima Armistead Moore served as receiver of a portion of the estate. As receiver, Judge Moore employed his sons, Augustus Minton Moore and John A. Moore, to track down the original slaves and their heirs.


[Identification of item], PC.1762, Whedbee Freedmen Papers, State Archives of North Carolina, Raleigh, NC, USA.


Gift of Elizabeth Vann Moore, Edenton, N.C., and Mary Moore Rowe, Boston, Mass., 19 January 1989.


See also:

  1. Perquimans County Wills and Estates (Whedbee)Pasquotank County Estates (Whedbee)Supreme Court Original Case #9106 (62  N.C. Reports 192-197).

Additional information on topics found in this collection may be found in the Manuscript and Archives Reference System (MARS) at  http://www.ncarchives.dcr.state.nc.us


Files of Judge William Armistead Moore, receiver of so much of the estate of James P. Whedbee of Perquimans County as had been bequeathed to his slaves in 1852.

Whedbee, whose children had all predeceased him, died at the end of 1852 leaving an estate worth in excess of $200,000. In addition to specific bequests, he left a class bequest of 2/7ths of his property to his slaves, who were to be manumitted upon Whedbee's wife's death, outfitted for carrying on an agricultural life, and transported to Liberia. Whedbee further provided that if his wife remarried she was to take the same share of the property as if he had died intestate. Lavinia Whedbee dissented from the will and remarried, consequently removing certain of the slaves from the class to be manumitted. Because of these complications, Whedbee's executor failed to carry into effect the provisions in the will concerning the slaves to be freed before the outbreak of the Civil War which, naturally, halted efforts on the slaves' behalf. The effect of the Emancipation Proclamation was to restore to freedom those who had been re-enslaved and handed over to Lavinia Whedbee (then Mrs. Abram Riddick).

Whedbee's heirs-at-law brought action in 1866 to prevent execution of those provisions of the will touching the Slave beneficiaries, but the North Carolina Supreme Court ruled that there had been no lapse in that part of the will, that the slaves handed over to the widow were to share equally with those whose status in the manumitted class had remained unchanged, and ordered a decree for equal distribution among the original slaves and their heirs according to those principles. Judge Moore, as receiver, employed his sons, Augustus Minton Moore and John A. Moore, to track down the original slaves and their heirs (now scattered in New York, Boston, Washington, D.C., Yorktown, Va., and various North Carolina towns) so that their shares could be paid them. It appears from these papers that the original slaves had numbered 104, and that 104 equal shares of the residue of the estate, after Civil War losses and post-war depression, came to $70.00 per share.


Files of Judge William Armistead Moore, receiver of so much of the estate of James P. Whedbee of Perquimans County as had been bequeathed to his slaves in 1852.

Whedbee, whose children had all predeceased him, died at the end of 1852 leaving an estate worth in excess of $200,000. In addition to specific bequests, he left a class bequest of 2/7ths of his property to his slaves, who were to be manumitted upon Whedbee's wife's death, outfitted for carrying on an agricultural life, and transported to Liberia. Whedbee further provided that if his wife remarried she was to take the same share of the property as if he had died intestate. Lavinia Whedbee dissented from the will and remarried, consequently removing certain of the slaves from the class to be manumitted. Because of these complications, Whedbee's executor failed to carry into effect the provisions in the will concerning the slaves to be freed before the outbreak of the Civil War which, naturally, halted efforts on the slaves' behalf. The effect of the Emancipation Proclamation was to restore to freedom those who had been re-enslaved and handed over to Lavinia Whedbee (then Mrs. Abram Riddick).

Whedbee's heirs-at-law brought action in 1866 to prevent execution of those provisions of the will touching the Slave beneficiaries, but the North Carolina Supreme Court ruled that there had been no lapse in that part of the will, that the slaves handed over to the widow were to share equally with those whose status in the manumitted class had remained unchanged, and ordered a decree for equal distribution among the original slaves and their heirs according to those principles. Judge Moore, as receiver, employed his sons, Augustus Minton Moore and John A. Moore, to track down the original slaves and their heirs (now scattered in New York, Boston, Washington, D.C., Yorktown, Va., and various North Carolina towns) so that their shares could be paid them. It appears from these papers that the original slaves had numbered 104, and that 104 equal shares of the residue of the estate, after Civil War losses and post-war depression, came to $70.00 per share.


  • Moore, William Armistead.
  • Whedbee, James P., d.1852.
  • Freedmen.
  • Slave records.
  • Perquimans County (N.C.)
  • Liberia.

Physical Description
2 items

Physical Description
20 items

Physical Description
1 (one) volume and 64 items laid in

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5 items

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14 items

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10 items

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153 items

Physical Description
4 items