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Annie Laurie Burton Letters


Annie Laurie Burton, a native of Prospect Hill, Caswell County, began her career as an elementary school teacher. When the United States entered World War II, Burton trained as a field officer in the American Red Cross military welfare service and served in several arenas until the war's end. From 1948-1950, Burton worked with U.S. Army Special Services in occupied Germany.The collection includes primarily letters Burton wrote home from her overseas posts. However, the collection contains nine letters Burton wrote during 1942 from various sites in the United States during her training and preparation for work overseas. The collection includes approximately fourteen photographs, taken primari ... (more below)

Title

Annie Laurie Burton Letters

Collection Number

PC.1771

Date(s)

1942 - 1945; 1948 - 1949

Language

English

Physical Description
Items
114
Genre/Physical Characteristic

Including approximately 100 letters, and 14 photographs.

Physical Description
Items
127.00
Letters
91.00
Abstract

Annie Laurie Burton, a native of Prospect Hill, Caswell County, began her career as an elementary school teacher. When the United States entered World War II, Burton trained as a field officer in the American Red Cross military welfare service and served in several arenas until the war's end. From 1948-1950, Burton worked with U.S. Army Special Services in occupied Germany.

The collection includes primarily letters Burton wrote home from her overseas posts. However, the collection contains nine letters Burton wrote during 1942 from various sites in the United States during her training and preparation for work overseas. The collection includes approximately fourteen photographs, taken primarily overseas. Dates of the collection range from 1942 to 1949.

Physical Location

For current information on the location ofthese materials, please consult the Public Services Branch, State Archives of North Carolina.

Creator

Burton, Annie Laurie.

Repository

State Archives of North Carolina


This collection, primarily of letters, is arranged chronologically, with dates corresponding to Miss Burton's movement through the following geographic areas: 1)United States; 2)Australia; 3)New Guinea; 4)Philippine Islands; 5) Germany. Photographs in the collection were taken primarily in Australia.


Available for research.


Copyright is retained by the authors of these materials, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law (Title 17 US Code). Individual researchers are responsible for using these materials in conformance with copyright law as well as any donor restrictions accompanying the materials.


Processed by George Stevenson, July, 1989

Encoded by Fran Tracy-Walls, January, 2003


Annie Laurie Burton (d. Feb. 14, 1980) of Prospect Hill, Caswell County, educated at Lees-McRae College and Appalachian State University, commenced her career as an elementary school teacher in Caswell County public schools. When the United States entered World War II, she trained as a field officer in the American Red Cross military welfare service and subsequently served until the war's end in the Pacific Theatre of Operations. Following the war, 1948-1950, she worked with U.S. Army Special Services in occupiedGermany. After that tour of duty was completed, Miss Burton began work in the Alamance County Welfare Department and moved her career toward social work. After postgraduate studies in social work at Tulane University, she was named director of Social Services for Alamance County, an office she held until her retirement in September 1979.


Annie Laurie Burton (d. Feb. 14, 1980) of Prospect Hill, Caswell County, educated at Lees-McRae College and Appalachian State University, commenced her career as an elementary school teacher in Caswell County public schools. When the United States entered World War II, she trained as a field officer in the American Red Cross military welfare service and subsequently served until the war's end in the Pacific Theatre of Operations. Following the war, 1948-1950, she worked with U.S. Army Special Services in occupiedGermany. After that tour of duty was completed, Miss Burton began work in the Alamance County Welfare Department and moved her career toward social work. After postgraduate studies in social work at Tulane University, she was named director of Social Services for Alamance County, an office she held until her retirement in September 1979.


[Identification of item], PC.1771, Annie Laurie Burton Letters, State Archives of North Carolina, Raleigh, NC, USA.


Gift of Nancy Burton McCorkle (Mrs. D. H.), Burlington, N.C. 27512, July 20, 1989.


Additional information on topics found in this collection may be found in the Manuscript and Archives Reference System (MARS)  http://www.ncarchives.dcr.state.nc.us.


The letters in this collection are those written home by Annie Laurie Burton while training in the United States as a Red Cross field officer in 1942, from her overseas postings during the years from 1943 through 1945 in Australia, New Guinea, and the Philippine Islands, and during 1948 and 1949 while with Special Services in postwar Germany.

This collection, primarily of letters, is arranged chronologically, with dates corresponding to Miss Burton's movement through the following geographic areas: 1)United States; 2)Australia; 3)New Guinea; 4)Philippine Islands; 5) Germany. Photographs in the collection were taken primarily in Australia.


The letters in this collection are those written home by Annie Laurie Burton while training in the United States as a Red Cross field officer in 1942, from her overseas postings during the years from 1943 through 1945 in Australia, New Guinea, and the Philippine Islands, and during 1948 and 1949 while with Special Services in postwar Germany.


  • Burton, Annie Laurie, d. 1980.
  • Curtin, John, Mrs. (Elsie)
  • Knapp, Nicholas van der.
  • O'Connor, Basil, 1892-1972.
  • Air pilots.
  • Memorial Day.
  • Recreation.
  • Red Cross and Red Crescent.
  • Soldiers.
  • World War, 1939 - 1945--War work--Red Cross.
  • World War, 1939 - 1945--Women's work.
  • Australia.
  • Frankfurt am Main (Germany)
  • Germany.
  • Melbourne (Vic.)
  • New Guinea.
  • Philippines.

Physical Description
Letters
91.00

Box: PC.1771.1  
United States
1942

Descriptive Information
Physical Description
9 letters

Scope and Content

Letters, all undated, 2 written from Washington, D.C., 4 from Bowling Green, Va., 2 from San Francisco, Calif., and 1 from aboard the transport ship en route to Brisbane, Australia. The writer comments on her Red Cross training, her social life, and preparations for work overseas, and observes that she will have rank equivalent to an army captain. The last letter in this group contains a detailed description of the embarkation of 2000 enlisted men and 110 officers in San Francisco harbor for transport to the Pacific theatre of operations; a companion letter among the Australian correspondence is dated September 1943, written by Nicholas van der Knaap.

17001
Australia, .
Jan. 1943 - Aug. 12, 1944

Descriptive Information
Physical Description
44 letters

Scope and Content

Forty-four letters, etc. written from Australia describing work in American Red Cross clubs and canteens, chiefly in Sydney. Her letter dated Mar. 14, 1943, describes a visit to Melbourne ("their hospitality is unexcelled & I'm afraid it might even beat good ole Southern"). Letters dated Sept. 1, Sept. 8, and Sept., 15, 1943, refer to Eleanor Roosevelt's Australian visit ("she rushed up and shook my hand first of all"), but the letter describing the visit has not survived.

17002
New Guinea, .
Aug. 1944 - Jan. 1945

Descriptive Information
Physical Description
18 letters

Scope and Content

Eighteen letters, etc., describing work assignments and working conditions, her social life, and some contrasts between her life in Australia and in New Guinea.

17003
Philippine Islands, .
Feb. - Jul. 1945

Descriptive Information
Physical Description
10 letters

Scope and Content

The letter of Feb. 4, 1945, recounts her hair-raising flight, at the hands of "baby pilots," from Ora Bay in New Guinea to the Philippines. Her descriptions of the native sanitary, social, and economic conditions in the Philippines report them as much inferior to those in New Guinea, and characterizes the "filth, poverty & stench" as "inevitable". Her letter of June 2, 1945, details the effects of the U.S. military order mandating all road traffic to move in right, rather than left, lanes, and her letter of June 4, 1945, refers to the 10:00 p.m. curfew and describes a not very successful Memorial Day service attended chiefly by gaping Filopino children. This segment of correspondence is marked by growing disillusionment with working conditions and job assignments. Her final letter from the Philippines declares that she is "surrendering" and returning home.

17004
Germany, .
1948-1949

Descriptive Information
Physical Description
10 letters

Scope and Content

Letters written from Frankfurt describing her day-to-day life and excursions to Geissen, Luxembourg, and Berchtesgaden. Her letter of Sept. 16, 1948, gives a brief description of post-war Frankfurt, and her letter of Oct. 6, 1948, reports feeling defensive about the newness and smartness of her wardrobe in contrast to the "well-worn and old clothes" of her German fellow travellers to Geissen.

Physical Description
13 items

Ten Australian photographs: one of Miss Burton and Mrs. John Curtin, wife of the Australian prime minister; nine of Miss Burton on outings with servicemen. One Philippines photograph of Miss Burton and Basil O'Connor, American Red Cross National Chairman. Two studio portraits and a "gag" portrait of Miss Burton.