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Jonathan Stanley Tayloe Papers


Jonathan Stanley Tayloe (1890-1918) was the youngest of the three children of Watson and Addie (Hayes) Tayloe of Bertie County. Tayloe served as a soldier during World War I and on August 9, 1918 he was killed in the trenches while being shelled.The collection consists chiefly of correspondence. Most of the letters are personal and were written by Tayloe in different training camps to his family. One letter was written just before his death in Europe. The remaining papers relate to the recovery of his effects by his family and to his war risk insurance.

Title

Jonathan Stanley Tayloe Papers

Collection Number

PC.1856

Date(s)

1917 - 1920

Language

English

Physical Description
Items
51
Genre/Physical Characteristic

including primarily correspondence, some forms, 2 promissory notes, and 1 photograph.

Abstract

Jonathan Stanley Tayloe (1890-1918) was the youngest of the three children of Watson and Addie (Hayes) Tayloe of Bertie County. Tayloe served as a soldier during World War I and on August 9, 1918 he was killed in the trenches while being shelled.

The collection consists chiefly of correspondence. Most of the letters are personal and were written by Tayloe in different training camps to his family. One letter was written just before his death in Europe. The remaining papers relate to the recovery of his effects by his family and to his war risk insurance.

Physical Location

For current information on the location ofthese materials, please consult the Public Services Branch, State Archives of North Carolina.

Creator

Tayloe, Jonathan Stanley.

Repository

State Archives of North Carolina


Available for research.


Copyright is retained by the authors of these materials, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law (Title 17 US Code). Individual researchers are responsible for using these materials in conformance with copyright law as well as any donor restrictions accompanying the materials.


Processed by George Stevenson, February 12, 1997

Encoded by Fran Tracy-Walls, July 9, 2002


Jonathan Stanley Tayloe (1890-1918) was the youngest of the three children of Watson and Addie (Hayes) Tayloe of Bertie County. The family farm, in Windsor Township, appears to have been the family's mainstay, but the older son, Ernest Hayes Tayloe was also partner in the firm of Tayloe and Davis, Blacksmiths, Undertakers, and Wheelwrights in Windsor. The sister of the two young men, Ruth, married Clemmons W. Atkinson of Jackson, N.C., early in 1914.

Shortly after President Wilson declared war on Germany on April 6, 1917, he signed the Selective Draft Act and called for volunteers. On June 5 the twenty-seven year old Jonathan Stanley Tayloe registered with his draft board in Windsor and volunteered for service in the North Carolina National Guard. He was immediately sent to Camp Royster at Goldsboro, N.C., where he enlisted in Company I, 2d Infantry, NCNG, on June 6, 1917. Here he drilled and received some basic training until the end of July 1917, when he was assigned to Company I, 119th Infantry, and transferred to Camp Greene at Charlotte, N.C., for further training. On September 17, 1917, his regiment was sent to Camp Sevier at Greenville, S.C., where it was assigned to the 30th ("Old Hickory") Division. After seven months at Camp Sevier the division was shipped to England in May, 1918, and from there to Calais and the Eperlocques Training Area. Before division training was completed, the Old Hickory Division was marched into Belgium on July 4 to take up a support position in the Ypres sector. On August 9, 1918, Tayloe was killed in the trenches while being shelled.


Jonathan Stanley Tayloe (1890-1918) was the youngest of the three children of Watson and Addie (Hayes) Tayloe of Bertie County. The family farm, in Windsor Township, appears to have been the family's mainstay, but the older son, Ernest Hayes Tayloe was also partner in the firm of Tayloe and Davis, Blacksmiths, Undertakers, and Wheelwrights in Windsor. The sister of the two young men, Ruth, married Clemmons W. Atkinson of Jackson, N.C., early in 1914.

Shortly after President Wilson declared war on Germany on April 6, 1917, he signed the Selective Draft Act and called for volunteers. On June 5 the twenty-seven year old Jonathan Stanley Tayloe registered with his draft board in Windsor and volunteered for service in the North Carolina National Guard. He was immediately sent to Camp Royster at Goldsboro, N.C., where he enlisted in Company I, 2d Infantry, NCNG, on June 6, 1917. Here he drilled and received some basic training until the end of July 1917, when he was assigned to Company I, 119th Infantry, and transferred to Camp Greene at Charlotte, N.C., for further training. On September 17, 1917, his regiment was sent to Camp Sevier at Greenville, S.C., where it was assigned to the 30th ("Old Hickory") Division. After seven months at Camp Sevier the division was shipped to England in May, 1918, and from there to Calais and the Eperlocques Training Area. Before division training was completed, the Old Hickory Division was marched into Belgium on July 4 to take up a support position in the Ypres sector. On August 9, 1918, Tayloe was killed in the trenches while being shelled.


[Identification of item], PC.1856, Jonathan Stanley Tayloe Papers, State Archives of North Carolina, Raleigh, NC, USA.


Gift, Mrs. Marian T. Curtis. Raleigh, N.C., January 27, 1997.


Additional information on topics found in this collection may be found in the Manuscript and Archives Reference System (MARS) at  http://www.ncarchives.dcr.state.nc.us


This collection of letters is basically those written by Jonathan Stanley Tayloe to his brother Ernest, his sister-in-law Gladys, and his sister Mrs. Atkinson. All but one of the letters written by Tayloe were written from one of the three training camps he was in from June 1917 to May 1918. There is but one surviving letter written home from Europe. The letters speak from time to time of his army training, but most often they speak of matters at home: the disposition of a cow he owns, the farm jointly owned by the three siblings, crops, hog killing, and so forth. Eighteen of the personal letters are written to his brother Ernest; nine are written to his sister-in-law Gladys; one is written to his sister Mrs. Atkinson. The last personal letter in the collection was written to Tayloe from his sister-in-law, and appears to have arrived after his death and, so, to have been returned to his family. The remaining letters in the collection arise from government correspondence relating to the return of Tayloe's effects to his family, 1919-1920; and blank liberty bond forms. Miscellaneous materials include a photograph of Tayloe with two of his closest friends (presumably taken at Camp Greene), his draft registration certificate, and two promissory notes from fellow soldiers in his regiment.


This collection of letters is basically those written by Jonathan Stanley Tayloe to his brother Ernest, his sister-in-law Gladys, and his sister Mrs. Atkinson. All but one of the letters written by Tayloe were written from one of the three training camps he was in from June 1917 to May 1918. There is but one surviving letter written home from Europe. The letters speak from time to time of his army training, but most often they speak of matters at home: the disposition of a cow he owns, the farm jointly owned by the three siblings, crops, hog killing, and so forth. Eighteen of the personal letters are written to his brother Ernest; nine are written to his sister-in-law Gladys; one is written to his sister Mrs. Atkinson. The last personal letter in the collection was written to Tayloe from his sister-in-law, and appears to have arrived after his death and, so, to have been returned to his family. The remaining letters in the collection arise from government correspondence relating to the return of Tayloe's effects to his family, 1919-1920; and blank liberty bond forms. Miscellaneous materials include a photograph of Tayloe with two of his closest friends (presumably taken at Camp Greene), his draft registration certificate, and two promissory notes from fellow soldiers in his regiment.


  • United States. Army. Infantry Regiment, 119th.
  • Soldiers--Correspondence.
  • World War, 1914-1918.
  • Bertie County (N.C.)
  • Camp Greene (N.C.)
  • Camp Royster (N.C.)
  • Camp Sevier (S.C.)