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Chauncey W. Curtis Manuscript


Chauncey W. Curtis was born in 1843. During the Civil War, Curtis was a private in the 41st New York Volunteers.This collection contains a 26-page manuscript entitled "The Burnside Expedition to Roanoke," and a sheet folded to make four printed pages containing an obituary of Chauncey W. Curtis, 1843-1914. The manuscript, written about 1900, recounts the memories of Curtis as a private soldier in the Battle of Roanoke Island and the capture of New Bern in 1862. The obituary was published by the Grand Army of the Republic post of which he was a member until his death.

Title

Chauncey W. Curtis Manuscript

Collection Number

PC.1865

Date(s)

1862

Language

English

Physical Description
Items
2
Genre/Physical Characteristic

26-page MS and 4-page printed obituary

Abstract

Chauncey W. Curtis was born in 1843. During the Civil War, Curtis was a private in the 41st New York Volunteers.

This collection contains a 26-page manuscript entitled "The Burnside Expedition to Roanoke," and a sheet folded to make four printed pages containing an obituary of Chauncey W. Curtis, 1843-1914. The manuscript, written about 1900, recounts the memories of Curtis as a private soldier in the Battle of Roanoke Island and the capture of New Bern in 1862. The obituary was published by the Grand Army of the Republic post of which he was a member until his death.

Physical Location

For current information on the location ofthese materials, please consult the Public Services Branch, State Archives of North Carolina.

Creator

Curtis, Chauncey W., 1843-1914.

Repository

State Archives of North Carolina


Available for research.


Copyright is retained by the authors of these materials, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law (Title 17 US Code). Individual researchers are responsible for using these materials in conformance with copyright law as well as any donor restrictions accompanying the materials.


Processed by George Stevenson, September 8, 1998

Encoded by Fran Tracy-Walls, July 22, 2002


Chauncey W. Curtis was born in 1843. During the Civil War, Curtis was a private in the 41st New York Volunteers. During the war, his regiment moved from Chesapeake Bay to North Carolina as part of General Reno's brigade in Burnside's Expedition. Curtis died in 1914.


Chauncey W. Curtis was born in 1843. During the Civil War, Curtis was a private in the 41st New York Volunteers. During the war, his regiment moved from Chesapeake Bay to North Carolina as part of General Reno's brigade in Burnside's Expedition. Curtis died in 1914.


[Identification of item], PC.1865, Chauncey W. Curtis Manuscript, State Archives of North Carolina, North Carolina Division of Historical Resources, Raleigh, NC, USA.


Originally classed as Orange County record (CR.073.926.1)but transferred to Account Books on July 23, 1996.


Additional information on topics found in this collection may be found in the Manuscript and Archives Reference System (MARS) at  http://www.ncarchives.dcr.state.nc.us


Twenty-six page manuscript entitled,  "The Burnside Expeditionto Roanoke", written by Curtis to be read at a Union Veterans' Unionmeeting, probably about 1900. The text recounts the movement of Curtisand his regiment, the 51st New York Volunteers down Chesapeake Bay toNorth Carolina as part of General Reno's brigade in Burnside's Expedition,describes the entry of the fleet through Hatteras Inlet into Pamlico Sound,and tells his experience of the Battle of Roanoke Island. Curtis speaksfully of the hazardous passage from the ocean into the sound during a violentstorm, the difficulty of getting the fleet through the channel of the Roanokemarshes, and the landing of U.S. forces on the beach at Roanoke Island.His account of the assault on the Confederate field work on the island iswritten from the personal perspective of a private soldier engaged inbattle, and not from that of a field officer surveying the whole scene.In his manuscript, Curtis also briefly describes the Battle of New Bernand mentions an April 19, 1862, expedition against "the town of Camden",by which one assumes he means South Mills and the Dismal Swamp Canal locklocated there.

Accompanying the manuscript is a printed obituary,  "In Memoriam", of Chauncey W. Curtis, 1843-1914, published by James Bryant Post (No.119), Department of Minnesota, of the Grand Army of the Republic, on a sheet folded to make four pages.


Twenty-six page manuscript entitled,  "The Burnside Expeditionto Roanoke", written by Curtis to be read at a Union Veterans' Unionmeeting, probably about 1900. The text recounts the movement of Curtisand his regiment, the 51st New York Volunteers down Chesapeake Bay toNorth Carolina as part of General Reno's brigade in Burnside's Expedition,describes the entry of the fleet through Hatteras Inlet into Pamlico Sound,and tells his experience of the Battle of Roanoke Island. Curtis speaksfully of the hazardous passage from the ocean into the sound during a violentstorm, the difficulty of getting the fleet through the channel of the Roanokemarshes, and the landing of U.S. forces on the beach at Roanoke Island.His account of the assault on the Confederate field work on the island iswritten from the personal perspective of a private soldier engaged inbattle, and not from that of a field officer surveying the whole scene.In his manuscript, Curtis also briefly describes the Battle of New Bernand mentions an April 19, 1862, expedition against "the town of Camden",by which one assumes he means South Mills and the Dismal Swamp Canal locklocated there.

Accompanying the manuscript is a printed obituary,  "In Memoriam", of Chauncey W. Curtis, 1843-1914, published by James Bryant Post (No.119), Department of Minnesota, of the Grand Army of the Republic, on a sheet folded to make four pages.


  • United States. Army. New York Volunteer Regiment, 51st (1861-1865)
  • Battles.
  • Burnside's Expedition to North Carolina, 1862.
  • New Bern, Battle of, New Bern, N.C., 1862.
  • North Carolina--History--Civil War, 1861-1865.
  • Roanoke Island (N.C.)--History--Capture, 1862.