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James A. Stone Papers


James Albert Stone (c.1820-1882) was one of the sons of Jonathan Murray Stone, representative in the General Assembly from Granville and Nash counties. Though James A. Stone, like his brothers Francis M. and Silas M., taught in the common schools of North Carolina, he is consistently reported as a farmer in the federal censuses.The collection consists almost entirely of promissory notes, bills, and receipts dating from 1842 to 1880. Miscellaneous papers include an 1845 contract to teach school; a letter from Stone's wife dated Jan. 17, 1854; a note from his father, Jonathan Murray Stone; a 50 cent fractional currency notes of the state of Georgia, series of Jan. 1, 1863; an undated table of ... (more below)

Title

James A. Stone Papers

Collection Number

PC.1866

Date(s)

1842 - 1880

Language

English

Physical Description
Items
43
Genre/Physical Characteristic

includes bills and receipts, promissory notes, 1 letter, 1 CSA bill of sale, 1-50 cents fractional currency of Georgia of the Jan 1, 1863 issue,miscellaneous papers.

Abstract

James Albert Stone (c.1820-1882) was one of the sons of Jonathan Murray Stone, representative in the General Assembly from Granville and Nash counties. Though James A. Stone, like his brothers Francis M. and Silas M., taught in the common schools of North Carolina, he is consistently reported as a farmer in the federal censuses.

The collection consists almost entirely of promissory notes, bills, and receipts dating from 1842 to 1880. Miscellaneous papers include an 1845 contract to teach school; a letter from Stone's wife dated Jan. 17, 1854; a note from his father, Jonathan Murray Stone; a 50 cent fractional currency notes of the state of Georgia, series of Jan. 1, 1863; an undated table of temperatures and hours for firing a barn of tobacco; and an undated final settlement for the estate of H. Ezell.

Physical Location

For current information on the location ofthese materials, please consult the Public Services Branch, State Archives of North Carolina.

Creator

Stone, James A., ca. 1820-1882.

Repository

State Archives of North Carolina


Available for research.


Copyright is retained by the authors of these materials, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law (Title 17 US Code). Individual researchers are responsible for using these materials in conformance with copyright law as well as any donor restrictions accompanying the materials.


Processed by George Stevenson, May 12, 1997

Encoded by Fran Tracy-Walls, July 17, 2002


James Albert Stone (c.1820-1882) was one of the sons of Jonathan Murray Stone, representative in the General Assembly from Granville and Nash counties. Though James A. Stone, like his brothers Francis M. and Silas M., taught in the common schools of North Carolina, he is consistently reported as a farmer in the federal censuses. He attended Wake Forest College, where he was a member of the Philomathesian Society, in 1844 and 1845. Immediately upon leaving Wake Forest, Stone negotiated a contract to teach a school in the Ledge of Rocks district of Granville County, but it is not clear whether the contract was finalized or not. In 1847 he married Matilda H. Stacy of Granville County, by whom he had eleven children. Although the couple lived in Franklin County in 1850, by 1854 she appears to have been living with their children in the Ledge of Rocks district while he was away teaching at an unknown location. Sometime before 1860 both he and his father had moved their families to Nash County. After the Civil War Stone moved his family to Franklin County (leaving his father in Nash), where he died in 1882.


James Albert Stone (c.1820-1882) was one of the sons of Jonathan Murray Stone, representative in the General Assembly from Granville and Nash counties. Though James A. Stone, like his brothers Francis M. and Silas M., taught in the common schools of North Carolina, he is consistently reported as a farmer in the federal censuses. He attended Wake Forest College, where he was a member of the Philomathesian Society, in 1844 and 1845. Immediately upon leaving Wake Forest, Stone negotiated a contract to teach a school in the Ledge of Rocks district of Granville County, but it is not clear whether the contract was finalized or not. In 1847 he married Matilda H. Stacy of Granville County, by whom he had eleven children. Although the couple lived in Franklin County in 1850, by 1854 she appears to have been living with their children in the Ledge of Rocks district while he was away teaching at an unknown location. Sometime before 1860 both he and his father had moved their families to Nash County. After the Civil War Stone moved his family to Franklin County (leaving his father in Nash), where he died in 1882.


[Identification of item], PC.1866, James A. Stone Papers, State Archives of North Carolina, Raleigh, NC, USA.


Gift, Miss Virginia S. Haupa, Sarasota, FL, 1996.


Additional information on topics found in this collection may be found in the Manuscript and Archives Reference System (MARS) at  http://www.ncarchives.dcr.state.nc.us


Nearly the whole of this small collection is made up of promissory notes and bills and receipts dating from 1842 to 1880. There are 10 promissory notes ranging in date from 1843 to 1857 payable to lenders in Granville, Nash, Johnston, Wake, and Randolph counties. Three of the receipted bills relate to Stone's student days at Wake Forest College, three to hired labor (1848, 1857, and 1870), two are board and bar bills from 1849, and the remainder are for provisions, clothing, and such, except for a doctor's bill from 1880.

The miscellaneous papers include the 1845 contract to teach school; a letter from his wife dated Jan. 17, 1854; an 1857 tax receipt; an 1862 bill of sale for unfit CSA cavalry horses; a 50 cents fractional currency notes of the State of Georgia, series of Jan. 1, 1863; a note from his father concerning the sale of a bale of cotton, presumably from the Nash County farm, dated Feb. 5, 1871; and undated table of temperatures and hours for firing a barn of tobacco, possibly drawn up at Wentworth, Rockingham County; an undated recipe for the cure of a mad dog's bite (possibly a joke); and an undated final settlement for the estate of H. Ezell, whose widow Francis H. had married J. A. Stone. In relation to the latter, it might be worth noting that a J. A. Stone acted as surety for James A. Stone's 1843 promissory note.


Nearly the whole of this small collection is made up of promissory notes and bills and receipts dating from 1842 to 1880. There are 10 promissory notes ranging in date from 1843 to 1857 payable to lenders in Granville, Nash, Johnston, Wake, and Randolph counties. Three of the receipted bills relate to Stone's student days at Wake Forest College, three to hired labor (1848, 1857, and 1870), two are board and bar bills from 1849, and the remainder are for provisions, clothing, and such, except for a doctor's bill from 1880.

The miscellaneous papers include the 1845 contract to teach school; a letter from his wife dated Jan. 17, 1854; an 1857 tax receipt; an 1862 bill of sale for unfit CSA cavalry horses; a 50 cents fractional currency notes of the State of Georgia, series of Jan. 1, 1863; a note from his father concerning the sale of a bale of cotton, presumably from the Nash County farm, dated Feb. 5, 1871; and undated table of temperatures and hours for firing a barn of tobacco, possibly drawn up at Wentworth, Rockingham County; an undated recipe for the cure of a mad dog's bite (possibly a joke); and an undated final settlement for the estate of H. Ezell, whose widow Francis H. had married J. A. Stone. In relation to the latter, it might be worth noting that a J. A. Stone acted as surety for James A. Stone's 1843 promissory note.


  • Stone family.
  • Philomathesian Society (Wake Forest University)
  • Teachers.
  • Franklin County (N.C.)
  • Granville County (N.C.)
  • Nash County (N.C.)