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Don Page Collection


Donald Page (1917- ) was born and brought up in Denver, Colorado. He entered Black Mountain College, Black Mountain, N.C. in September, 1936, where he studied art under Josef Albers and weaving and textile design under Anni Albers. After his graduation in May, 1941, Page returned for postgraduate studies at Black Mountain College in the fall of 1941, and the spring of 1942.This collection of materials is made up of textiles, drawings, and studies done by Don Page under both Josef and Anni Albers at Black Mountain College during the period from 1936 to 1942.

Title

Don Page Collection

Collection Number

PC.1924

Date(s)

1936 - 1942

Language

English

Physical Description
Items
256
Physical Description
Items
512.00
Abstract

Donald Page (1917- ) was born and brought up in Denver, Colorado. He entered Black Mountain College, Black Mountain, N.C. in September, 1936, where he studied art under Josef Albers and weaving and textile design under Anni Albers. After his graduation in May, 1941, Page returned for postgraduate studies at Black Mountain College in the fall of 1941, and the spring of 1942.

This collection of materials is made up of textiles, drawings, and studies done by Don Page under both Josef and Anni Albers at Black Mountain College during the period from 1936 to 1942.

Physical Location

For current information on the location ofthese materials, please consult the Western Regional Archives.

Creator

Page, Don, 1917-

Repository

Western Regional Archives, State Archives of North Carolina


Available for research.


Copyright is retained by the authors of these materials, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law (Title 17 US Code). Individual researchers are responsible for using these materials in conformance with copyright law as well as any donor restrictions accompanying the materials.


Processed by George Stevenson, November, 2002

Encoded by Ashley Yandle, September, 2004


Donald Page (1917- ) was born and brought up in Denver, Colorado. He entered Black Mountain College, Black Mountain, N.C. in September, 1936, where he studied art under Josef Albers and weaving and textile design under Anni Albers. During the summer months Page found employment in order to help pay his college expenses. During one summer, upon the recommendation of Mrs. Albers, he worked with the WPA, teaching weaving to local women in Charlotte and Wilmington, N.C. During the course of another summer he worked as a designer for the Callaway Mills in Georgia. After his graduation in May, 1941, Page returned for postgraduate studies at Black Mountain College in the fall of 1941, and the spring of 1942 before entering the U.S. Air Corps. After World War II he studied in the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University.

Black Mountain College was an experimental school located in Black Mountain, N.C. Established in 1933 by John A. Rice and others, the purpose of the college was to educate the whole person, with an emphasis on the role of the arts and creative thinking. Despite the fact that Black Mountain College could rarely offer faculty more than room and board, a number of important teachers and artists were drawn to the school as part of the regular faculty or to participate in the school's Summer Institutes. Josef and Anni Albers, John Cage, Robert Creeley, Merce Cunningham, Max Dehn, Joseph Fiore, Buckminister Fuller, Edward Lowinsky, Robert Motherwell, Charles Olson, M.C. Richards, and Xanti Schawinsky were only a few of those who taught at Black Mountain College. In addition, the success of several of the college's students helped to further the college's reputation in the area of the arts and the avant garde.

The character and focus of Black Mountain College shifted over time, according to the make-up of the faculty and students. Personal and ideological conflicts were common and sometimes lead to major changes in the college community. Lack of funds added to the stress of the situation, as did the school's physical isolation and its sometimes strained relations with the local population. Eventually, the student enrollment and available funds dwindled until the college was forced to close in 1956.


Donald Page (1917- ) was born and brought up in Denver, Colorado. He entered Black Mountain College, Black Mountain, N.C. in September, 1936, where he studied art under Josef Albers and weaving and textile design under Anni Albers. During the summer months Page found employment in order to help pay his college expenses. During one summer, upon the recommendation of Mrs. Albers, he worked with the WPA, teaching weaving to local women in Charlotte and Wilmington, N.C. During the course of another summer he worked as a designer for the Callaway Mills in Georgia. After his graduation in May, 1941, Page returned for postgraduate studies at Black Mountain College in the fall of 1941, and the spring of 1942 before entering the U.S. Air Corps. After World War II he studied in the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University.


Black Mountain College was an experimental school located in Black Mountain, N.C. Established in 1933 by John A. Rice and others, the purpose of the college was to educate the whole person, with an emphasis on the role of the arts and creative thinking. Despite the fact that Black Mountain College could rarely offer faculty more than room and board, a number of important teachers and artists were drawn to the school as part of the regular faculty or to participate in the school's Summer Institutes. Josef and Anni Albers, John Cage, Robert Creeley, Merce Cunningham, Max Dehn, Joseph Fiore, Buckminister Fuller, Edward Lowinsky, Robert Motherwell, Charles Olson, M.C. Richards, and Xanti Schawinsky were only a few of those who taught at Black Mountain College. In addition, the success of several of the college's students helped to further the college's reputation in the area of the arts and the avant garde.

The character and focus of Black Mountain College shifted over time, according to the make-up of the faculty and students. Personal and ideological conflicts were common and sometimes lead to major changes in the college community. Lack of funds added to the stress of the situation, as did the school's physical isolation and its sometimes strained relations with the local population. Eventually, the student enrollment and available funds dwindled until the college was forced to close in 1956.


[Identification of item], PC.1924, Don Page Collection, State Archives of North Carolina, Western Regional Archives, Asheville, NC, USA.


Gift, Don Page, Chilmark, MA, 2002. During March-April, 2012, these records were moved from the State Archives building in Raleigh to the Western Regional Archives, Asheville, N.C.


Additional information on topics found in this collection may be found in the Manuscript and Archives Reference System (MARS)  http://www.ncarchives.dcr.state.nc.us.

  1.  PC.1197, Anni Albers Collection, 1937-1966.  PC.1678, Martin Duberman Collection, 1933-1980.  North Carolina Museum of Art, Black Mountain College Research Project, 1933-1973.

This collection of materials is made up of work done by Don Page under both Josef and Anni Albers at Black Mountain College during the period from 1936 to 1942. The collection is divided, accordingly, as  "Textile Design" and  "Drawings and Studies."


This collection of materials is made up of work done by Don Page under both Josef and Anni Albers at Black Mountain College during the period from 1936 to 1942. The collection is divided, accordingly, as  "Textile Design" and  "Drawings and Studies."


  • Albers, Anni.
  • Albers, Josef.
  • Black Mountain College (Black Mountain, N.C.)
  • Architectural design.
  • Color in art.
  • Figure drawing.
  • Portraits.
  • Still-life painting.
  • Textile design.
  • Textile fabrics.
  • Weaving--United States--History--20th century.

Physical Description
36 items

Includes examples of Page's college work using various dyed and undyed threads: wool, cotton, linen, rayon, and jute. They are boxed according to the size of the example, larger examples being boxed together, and small examples together. A finished and zippered cushion cover in cotton, and the large woven unbleached piece from which was cut, will be found in Box 2. Two delicate examples have been encapsulated and are also boxed with the larger examples in Box 2: (1) Delicate fabric with stretched threads; and (2) Orange fabric with changed threads (exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art as part of the museum's Albers exhibit).

Box: PC.1924.1  
Small Examples

Box: PC.1924.2  
Large Examples

Physical Description
220 items

Includes 220 pieces of Page's student work in pencil, ink, watercolor, gouache, crayon, charcoal, and oil, as well as some collages in paper and fabric. They have been foldered by genre, rather than by medium. Some of them have studies on both sides of the paper, not always of the same genre. Two studies in architectural and interior design have been foldered as Double Oversize and are housed with double folio materials from other collections.

Box: PC.1924.3  
Figure studies

Small
Large
Female
Male

27115
Portrait studies

Female
Male

27118
Still-life studies

Clothing; Drapery
Crockery
Flowers; Botanical specimens
Fruit
Miscellaneous
Musical instruments
Wool from a distaff (exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art)

Box: PC.1924.4  
Abstract studies

27127
Architectural design

27128
Collages

27129
Landscapes

27130
Letter and Numeral design

27131
Photo montages

27132
Poster art

27133
Textile designs

27134
Studies on color (on board)

Folder: PC.1924.5  
Double Oversize Studies

Study/sitting room with blue and red chairs (ink and gouache)
Building in a receding plane (ink, film applique, gouache, and grey wash)