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Virginia Ross Papers


Virginia Ross moved to the Outer Banks with her husband and children in 1975 from Washington D.C. She belonged to many conservation groups and conducted her own ecological study of the Outer Banks. Her vast horticultural knowledge enabled her to act as a consultant to the book Wildflowers of the Outer Banks. Mrs. Ross spent many hours identifying and classifying Aycock Brown photographs for David Stick.The Virginia Ross Papers consist of materials relating to her various research interests on the Outer Banks including horticultural, ecology and conservation.

Title

Virginia Ross Papers

Collection Number

PC.5041

Date(s)

1951-1997

Box 1Box 2
Language

English

Physical Description
Cubic feet
0.60
Abstract

Virginia Ross moved to the Outer Banks with her husband and children in 1975 from Washington D.C. She belonged to many conservation groups and conducted her own ecological study of the Outer Banks. Her vast horticultural knowledge enabled her to act as a consultant to the book  Wildflowers of the Outer Banks. Mrs. Ross spent many hours identifying and classifying Aycock Brown photographs for David Stick.

The Virginia Ross Papers consist of materials relating to her various research interests on the Outer Banks including horticultural, ecology and conservation.

Physical Location

3A2-3A3

Creator

Ross, Virginia

Repository

Outer Banks History Center


The Virginia Ross papers are arranged alphabetically by topic.


Available for research.


Copyright is retained by the authors of these materials, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law (Title 17 U.S. Code). Individual researchers are responsible for using these materials in conformance with copyright law as well as any donor restrictions accompanying the materials.


Processed by Outer Banks History Center staff

Encoded by Christine A. Dumoulin, December, 2007


Virginia Ross discovered the Outer Banks while vacationing in 1951, and moved to the area with her husband and children in 1975 from Washington D.C. She belonged to many conservation groups and conducted her own ecological study of the Outer Banks. Through these studies, she targeted problem areas and did what she could to improve situations. Her vast horticultural knowledge enabled her to act as a consultant to the book  Wildflowers of the Outer Banks. Mrs. Ross spent many hours identifying and classifying Aycock Brown photographs for David Stick; her system is still in place at the Outer Banks History Center.


Formerly classified as 33MSS-41


[Identification of item], PC.5041, Virginia Ross Papers, Outer Banks History Center, Manteo, N.C., U.S.A.


Donated by Virginia Ross in 1997.


The Virginia Ross papers consist of materials relating to her various research interests on the Outer Banks including horticultural, ecology and conservation. There are research notes, manuscripts, newspapers, photocopies and notebooks.


  • Brown, Aycock
  • Midgette, Louis
  • Wright, Orville, 1871-1948
  • Wright, Wilbur, 1867-1912
  • Civilian Conservation Corps (U.S.)
  • Lost Colony (Symphonic drama)
  • Architecture
  • African Americans
  • Cemeteries--North Carolina--Dare County
  • Ecology
  • Education
  • Folklore
  • Genealogy
  • Horticulture
  • Religion
  • Currituck (N.C.)

Folder: 1:1.15  
Fishing

Folder: 1:1.16  
Hunting

Folder: 1:1.17  
Lighthouses, Lifesaving Stations, Coast Guard

Folder: 1:1.18  
Newspaper Clippings