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The Oteen


The Oteen was one of several field magazines authorized for publication by the Surgeon General of the Army during World War I. The weekly magazine was produced and managed by volunteer editors and contributors from U.S. Army General Hospital No. 19, a hospital established in Azalea, N.C. in 1918.The Oteen was made available to patients and staff at the hospital, as well as civilians from the surrounding community.The collection is comprised of one bound volume containing twenty-four issues ofThe Oteen. The magazine covered local events and happenings related to the hospital, such as new ward arrivals, social programming, and general gossip. The magazine also featured essays, poetry, and artw ... (more below)

Title

The Oteen

Collection Number

PC.7012

Creator

U.S. Army General Hospital No. 19

Repository

Western Regional Archives, State Archives of North Carolina


The issues are arranged chronologically.


There are no access restrictions on this collection.


Copyright is retained by the authors of these materials, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law (Title 17 US Code). Individual researchers are responsible for using these materials in conformance with copyright law as well as any donor restrictions accompanying the materials.


 The Oteen was one of several field magazines authorized for publication by the Surgeon General of the Army during World War I. The weekly magazine was produced and managed by volunteer editors and contributors from U.S. Army General Hospital No. 19, a hospital established in Azalea, N.C. in 1918.  The Oteen was made available to patients and staff at the hospital, as well as civilians from the surrounding community. The magazine received no governmental aid, as costs were covered almost entirely by circulation and advertising revenue. However, the magazine was still subject to regulations set forth by the Joint Committee on Printing. In September 1919, the Surgeon General was instructed to cut the number of authorized field publications from twelve to seven. Though  The Oteenwas one of the seven slated to continue, the Joint Committee of Printing issued new regulations stating that all such publications could no longer run advertisements.

In November 1919, an anonymous letter was received by the Joint Committee on Printing alerting them that  The   Oteen was still printing advertisements in its publication. An immediate investigation was launched, but it was determined that the magazine, with the Surgeon General's approval, was only finishing out advertising contracts made before the ban was in place. The last issue of  The  Oteen was published November 29, 1919. An announcement was published shortly after in the  Asheville Citizen stating that the paper's editor-in-chief, Sergeant Russel Radford, was expecting his discharge from the hospital and that no further issues of  The   Oteen would be published.


 The Oteen was one of several field magazines authorized for publication by the Surgeon General of the Army during World War I. The weekly magazine was produced and managed by volunteer editors and contributors from U.S. Army General Hospital No. 19, a hospital established in Azalea, N.C. in 1918.  The Oteen was made available to patients and staff at the hospital, as well as civilians from the surrounding community.

The collection is comprised of one bound volume containing twenty-four issues of  The Oteen. The magazine covered local events and happenings related to the hospital, such as new ward arrivals, social programming, and general gossip. The magazine also featured essays, poetry, and artwork produced by hospital patients.


Finding aid completed by Sara Kaglic, February 2017


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