Finding Aid of the James Boon Papers, <date calendar="gregorian" era="ce" normal="1829/1853">1829 - 1853</date>, PC.99

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Finding Aid of the James Boon Papers, <date calendar="gregorian" era="ce" normal="1829/1853">1829 - 1853</date>, PC.99

Abstract

James Boon (1808-?), a free African American of Franklin County, N.C., was apprenticed to William Jones, a carpenter, June 16, 1827, and was freed from this apprenticeship in September, 1829. He thereafter worked as a carpenter in Louisburg, Littleton, Wilmington, and Raleigh.
The papers include both professional and personal correspondence as well as accounts, bills, receipts, and other documents.

James Boon (1808-?), a free African American of Franklin County, N.C., was apprenticed to William Jones, a carpenter, June 16, 1827, and was freed from this apprenticeship in September, 1829. He thereafter worked as a carpenter in Louisburg, Littleton, Wilmington, and Raleigh. The papers include both professional and personal correspondence as well as accounts, bills, receipts, and other documents.

Descriptive Summary

Title
James Boon Papers
Call Number
PC.99
Creator
Boon, James, b. 1808
Date
1829 - 1853
Extent
192.00 items
Language
English
Repository
State Archives of North Carolina

Series Quick Links

  1. Collection Contents

Restrictions on Access & Use

Access Restrictions

Available for research.

Use Restrictions

Copyright is retained by the authors of these materials, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law (Title 17 US Code). Individual researchers are responsible for using these materials in conformance with copyright law as well as any donor restrictions accompanying the materials.

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], PC.99, James Boon Papers, State Archives of North Carolina, Raleigh, NC, USA.

Collection Overview

Much of the correspondence involves Boon's work as a carpenter, in which he hired both slaves and free African Americans to work for him. There are letters of recommendation from employers as to his character and his work. There are letters (1848) from his brother, Carter Evans, from Wilmington, which discuss the work and the men who are working for Boon, the scarcity of jobs, need for a protector for some of the men, etc., and asking Boon to come to Wilmington. (According to the above mentioned article in , a Wilmington ordinance required that a free Negro have a protector.)

Other correspondence includes letters from the slave Sarah, Boon's common law wife to him in Raleigh which discuss instructions regarding his business at home, family matters, saying "if you should get down sick... I know doubt but what my owners would let me come and stay with you,"; and suggesting that he come nearer home if possible.

William Jones, to whom Boon was apprenticed, evidently helped Boon with his business, keeping his accounts for him, writing letters for him (Boon could neither read nor write), advancing cash to him and his wife. (This relationship is indicated in accounts.) In a letter to Boon (1850) he writes in regard to Boon's business affairs in Louisburg, stating "I have not been able to rent your shop yet."

Accounts, receipts, notes, bills, etc., relate also to his business as a carpenter, reflecting names of employers as well as names of men who worked for Boon and wages received, merchandise and construction materials bought, etc.

Boon's ownership of property is reflected in an agreement between him and Wm. H. Furman, a white man who was renting Boon's house (1848), and by three copies of a notice that proceedings would be instigated for sale of his property to cover debts (1849).

Also included in the papers is a statement signed by the Clerk of Court, Franklin County, September, 1829, that James Boon, "a boy of colour who was bound to William Jones by this court" was now 21 years of age and ordered to be set free.

James Boon (1808-?), a free African American of Franklin County, N.C., was apprenticed to William Jones, a carpenter, June 16, 1827, and was freed from this apprenticeship in September, 1829. He thereafter worked as a carpenter in Louisburg, Littleton, Wilmington, and Raleigh. He cohabited with Sarah, a slave of Maria Stallings of Louisburg, as a common law wife from as early as 1838 until as late as 1850. By 1850 he was living with Mahalia Buffalo, a free woman of color from Raleigh, by whom he had a son and a daughter. These children were taught in 1851 by Isabella Hinton Harris, wife of James Henry Harris. Despite the protests of Sarah, Boon married Mahalia Buffalo in 1854. Boon owned land and property in Louisburg. For further information about him, see article by John Hope Franklin in Journal of Negro History, XXX (April, 1945), 150-180.

Much of the correspondence involves Boon's work as a carpenter, in which he hired both slaves and free African Americans to work for him. There are letters of recommendation from employers as to his character and his work. There are letters (1848) from his brother, Carter Evans, from Wilmington, which discuss the work and the men who are working for Boon, the scarcity of jobs, need for a protector for some of the men, etc., and asking Boon to come to Wilmington. (According to the above mentioned article in Journal of Negro History, a Wilmington ordinance required that a free Negro have a protector.)

Other correspondence includes letters from the slave Sarah, Boon's common law wife to him in Raleigh which discuss instructions regarding his business at home, family matters, saying "if you should get down sick... I know doubt but what my owners would let me come and stay with you,"; and suggesting that he come nearer home if possible.
William Jones, to whom Boon was apprenticed, evidently helped Boon with his business, keeping his accounts for him, writing letters for him (Boon could neither read nor write), advancing cash to him and his wife. (This relationship is indicated in accounts.) In a letter to Boon (1850) he writes in regard to Boon's business affairs in Louisburg, stating "I have not been able to rent your shop yet."

Accounts, receipts, notes, bills, etc., relate also to his business as a carpenter, reflecting names of employers as well as names of men who worked for Boon and wages received, merchandise and construction materials bought, etc.

Boon's ownership of property is reflected in an agreement between him and Wm. H. Furman, a white man who was renting Boon's house (1848), and by three copies of a notice that proceedings would be instigated for sale of his property to cover debts (1849).

Also included in the papers is a statement signed by the Clerk of Court, Franklin County, September, 1829, that James Boon, "a boy of colour who was bound to William Jones by this court" was now 21 years of age and ordered to be set free.

Arrangement Note

Arranged by type of materials.

Biographical Note

James Boon (1808-?), a free African American of Franklin County, N.C., was apprenticed to William Jones, a carpenter, June 16, 1827, and was freed from this apprenticeship in September, 1829. He thereafter worked as a carpenter in Louisburg, Littleton, Wilmington, and Raleigh. He cohabited with Sarah, a slave of Maria Stallings of Louisburg, as a common law wife from as early as 1838 until as late as 1850. By 1850 he was living with Mahalia Buffalo, a free woman of color from Raleigh, by whom he had a son and a daughter. These children were taught in 1851 by Isabella Hinton Harris, wife of James Henry Harris. Despite the protests of Sarah, Boon married Mahalia Buffalo in 1854. Boon owned land and property in Louisburg. For further information about him, see article by John Hope Franklin in , XXX (April, 1945), 150-180.

Contents of the Collection

Collection Contents
Correspondence
16958
Accounts, bills, receipts, etc.,1829-1835
16961
Miscellaneous
16962

Subject Headings

  • Buffalo, Mahalia
  • Jones, William
  • Stallings, Maria
  • Boon, James
  • Buffalo, Mahalia
  • Jones, William
  • Stallings, Maria
  • Carolina Hotel (Wilmington, N.C.)
  • African Americans--North Carolina--1829-1853
  • African American businesspeople--North Carolina
  • Carpenters--North Carolina--Correspondence
  • Slaves--United States--Social conditions
  • Carpenters
  • Free Blacks
  • Freedmen
  • Marriage
  • African American business enterprises
  • Business
  • Slaveholders
  • Apprenticeship Programs
  • Payments
  • African Americans
  • Louisburg (N.C.)
  • Raleigh (N.C.)
  • Raleigh (N.C.)
  • Louisburg
  • Wilmington (N.C.)
  • Goldsboro
  • Franklin County (N.C.)
  • Acquisitions Information

    Presented by Mrs. Alfred Williams, (from Biennial Report, 1930-1932)

    Processing Information

  • Processed by Betsy Fleshman, September, 1967
  • Encoded by Druscilla R. Simpson, April 25, 2000; additional encoding by Ashley Yandle, May, 2010